6.5 Magnitude Earthquake Hits California

A 6.5 magnitude earthquake hit the coast of California today as residents felt tremors throughout the northern portion of the state.

According to the United States Geological Survey, the quake struck at around 6:50 am local time, around 165 kilometers west of Ferndale, California at a depth of 10 kilometers.

Intensity

Initially authorites thought the earthquake was ranked at a 6.9 on the Richter Scale, but was revised and lowered to 6.5.

The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center of the National Weather Service said on their website that there is no current tsunami warning after the event, reassuring residents of the Pacific-border state.

Residents took to social media to talk about tremors and shaking heard throughout the state, with one user stating, “Apparently there was an earthquake in Ferndale? I felt shaking all the way in San Fransisco!”

The northern city is over 400 kilometers south of where the earthquake hit. Many users in San Fransisco also expressed their shock at feeling tremors from such a far distance from the actual quake.

Damages

Ferndale’s mayor, Don Hindley, assured The Independent that he has not heard of any damage as a result of the quake as of yet. He stated that he only felt about 15 seconds of shaking and nothing more.

He stated in the phone interview, “It wasn’t that bad at all.”

One local business owner in Ferndale said she did not realize the earthquake had hit until she felt a “jolt” as she reached for an item in her store. She described the shaking as “a feeling similar to being on a boat.”

Two earthquakes have hit California in the past week alone. The state, which contains the San Andreas Fault, is prone to earthquakes several times a year.

The news of the California quake comes just a day after a similar 6.5 magnitude quake struck Indonesia, killing over 100 residents.

California’s fate was much luckier as the quake stuck in the Pacific ocean, absorbing the majority of the tremors.

 

 

 



Karen enjoys fine dining and wine, ad specializes in tech and politics.